2010-05-21_NewBeginnings

Heath Sershen with a new lifelist species, the Greater Redhorse.

Heath Sershen with a new lifelist species, the Greater Redhorse.

I have now been working in Wabasha for about six months.  I started making the commute in November when the water had just began to start to turn over for the winter season.  I drive 30 miles of Highway that runs along the Mississippi River twice a day.

If you are a regular reader of my reports you will know that I have been playing catch-up and have not been writing and posting photographs as often as I once did.  I have many excuses for that.  One could say I have begun to lose the inspiration I was had with fishing exotic Trout species.  During this transitionary time I have been fishing a lot however seeking species that I have never caught before or species that I feel as though I had caught incidentally previously.  Further, I have many species of fish that I need to re-catch in order to document the proof of my catch-and-release quarry.

I have lived in Winona for eight years.  In that time I have spent over 1000 days on designated Trout water honing my ability to use a fly rod, read water, and match the hatch all while developing a mantra that affords me mental health hallmarks.

Heath Sershen with a new lifelist species, the Black Redhorse.

Heath Sershen with a new lifelist species, the Black Redhorse.

This season I intend to concentrate on the big river that flows through my back yard.  The same one that I drive 60 miles of each day.  The same big river that splits this country in two.  The same big river that holds fish over 75-pounds.  The same big river that is home to about 100 species of fish.  I have heard you calling my name for nearly a decade now Mississippi River and now I feel apt enough to forbode the training grounds of the feeder creeks and rivers that contribute to your greatness.

I have started this season with many great experiences; mayfly hatches in February, i have caught, handled, and released two species of fish that were previously unfamiliar to me, the Black Redhorse and the Greater Redhorse, and have caught numerous Bowfin on a fly.

Thank you again for visiting and here’s to another season on the water!

A sight fished male Bowfin that took a fly.

A sight fished male Bowfin that took a fly.